Did Someone Say Competitive Advantage? A Great New Book on Strategy

Did Some Say Competitive Advantage? A Great New Book on Strategy

“Did someone say competitive advantage?” In a booming voice, Dr. Chuck Bamford started his class on strategy, a capstone piece in the Notre Dame Executive MBA program. I was fortunate to follow this class with Dr. Bamford, and it has made a big difference to me.

Now Dr. Chuck has written a book entitled, “The Strategy Mindset”. In creating this pared-down tome, Bamford has distilled his wisdom on strategy to its essence. The book is easily read, but more importantly, presents a clear, logical and winning formula for doing strategy right. I know, because I have used this formula with several companies, always to great success. I have been waiting for Dr. Chuck to create this volume for some time now.

The author is a straight talker, and begins with some myth busting. He pulls no punches when he takes issue with a number of ideas about strategy, including some of the more common myths of the day, such as trying to be the low cost leader. He not only takes issue with these myths, but cogently explains why they don’t work.

In the rest of the volume, Dr. Chuck takes you step by step though strategy, presenting an overview of the model that is both strong and easy to understand. He begins with the importance external analysis. Many a business has been started with an idea, but if that idea is not based on a sound understanding of the market, its’ players and dynamics between them, the idea will probably not come to fruition.

The author then turns to an internal analysis of the company in order to understand what about the company makes them stand out in the marketplace. This is not a “My people are my advantage exercise.” Rather he seeks an understanding of what within the company creates the advantage, in order to focus resources on those facets.

The next stage of Dr. Chuck’s process is the creation of a one-page strategy map that make crystal clear what each person in a company must do for all to achieve success. To those that protest at the simplicity, Dr. Bamford insists that with proper preparation, if the exercise of creating a strategy takes more than two days, you are doing something wrong. The elements of the strategy map are:

  • The Value Driver: what creates value for the customer.
  • Stakeholder Statements: what you want the stakeholder to say about the company.
  • Need from the company: what we need to make this happen.
  • Must do individually: what I need to do to make this happen.
  • Metrics: how we will measure success.

I don’t often make endorsements, but I cannot speak highly enough of this book. You need to acquire a copy of The Strategy Mindset by Dr. Chuck Bamford today!

Be Thankful for What We Have

Several days ago, my wife was sworn in as an U.S. citizen in a ceremony in Chicago. Having dealt with the government bureaucracy throughout, we did not have high hopes for the occasion, but were pleasantly surprised by the ceremony that took place. Along with the 140 other new citizens and several hundred friends and families, we sang the national anthem and recited the pledge of allegiance. We watched a video about immigrants and also a music video with the song, “Proud to be an American”. The new citizens recited the oath to their new country.

For me, the highpoint of the ceremony was when the new citizens came forward to receive their certificate of naturalization. Of course, this is the digital age, so there were several new citizens taking selfie-videos of themselves receiving the certificate.

The person that impressed me the most was a gentleman in his 60’s, who really looked the part of an immigrant; neatly dressed but somewhat grizzled, with the rough hands of one who had done manual labor for many years. When he received his certificate, he held it aloft in both hands as high as he could reach to show it to friends and family across the room, and then began jumping up and down in a dance of sheer joy, a wide smile on his face. This was an important moment in this man’s life!

Of course, bureaucracy was on display that day as well. It took longer to check in the 141 prospective citizens than the actual ceremony. The Bulldog noted several quick changes in process that could have cut the time in less than half, but I kept my peace that day.

Afterwards, my wife told me about a comment that one of the bureaucrats made during the checking in lineup. Seeing the long line waiting to check in, she asked how many were there. When she was told that it was 141, she said, “Wow, why so many? Are they giving something away for free? I want some!” My wife had the right thought, but she did not verbalize at the time. I will now, “Ma’am, you’ve already got it, and you don’t even know!”

What the bureaucrat had was the liberty and blessings of being an American citizen. Unfortunately, at least at that moment, she seemed to have forgotten that fact. Many do, including myself from time to time. The freedom to live as I would like, to be an entrepreneur and build a business that supports my family and my community. The freedom to express myself and my ideas. We often take these things for granted, and often it is immigrants who remind about these freedoms.

To quote Churchill, “”Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.” (From a House of Commons speech on Nov. 11, 1947).

 

Do You Appear Too Powerful to Your Employees?

A number of years ago, I did some work for a large service corporation, one with over 10,000 employees. While I was there, I got to know a young person who worked there. This was his first job in a large corporation and he was frustrated. He felt that he could not get along with his manager and that his manager did not like him or treat him fairly. From everything I could see, this person was doing a good job and I did not understand why he felt that way.

I made a recommendation: before doing something that could have a significant and possibly negative effect on his career, I recommended that he sit down and talk to his manager, and tell him how he felt. I suppose that there are those who think that my suggestion was foolish, but I had not seen any sign from the manager that he felt this way about the young person.

The conversation took place, and the result surprised the young person. The manager apologized to him for the misperception. The manager’s remedy was also a great one. Starting the following week the manager and the young person would have breakfast together once a week and they would not discuss business. Rather, they would take time to get to know each other better.

The weekly meetings ensued, and in this case, they worked out very well. The manager and his employee actually became good friends, which they remain today. But even more importantly, the young person was able to use the mentoring he received from the manager to make significant growth that I know helped him enhance his career. The young person also learned an important lesson in management.

What is the lesson in this for us? Not that as a manager you need to be every employee’s best friend, but that you be open to understanding how you come across to other people in ways that you may not even realize. In particular, if you are the owner or head of a small business, you may be perceived by employees as being very powerful and hard to approach, in particular among your junior staff. Be aware of this when you are managing people, and be open to listening to your staff, and it will help you grow a business of loyal employees.

Genial Relationships and a High Performing Management Team

There comes a time in the life of many small companies when outstanding performance leads to growth. The small company no longer consists of the founder and a handful of employees. At some point, it becomes apparent that the founder cannot manage every aspect of operations, much as they would like. The company now needs a management team.

Forming any management team, let alone a high performing management team, is a challenging task. What follows is not a complete guide to the process of forming a management team, but a few ideas that I believe may be lost along the way. Among them are: a genial relationship among managers and commitment by the managers to each other, and to the company.

In the age of demanding executives, it would seem that the way that people relate to each other is less important than it might have been one time. I don’t have to mention names for anyone to think of one executive or another that is highly demanding with their team and less than cordial when their demands are not met. Despite the fame of these highly successful people, I believe it to be the exception rather than the rule.

In the instance of a small company management team, I believe that a “genial relationship” among the team is a crucial element to be high performing. Now, I don’t expect that a management team will restrict their social circle to the team, nor that every member of the team must be best friends, but I do believe that if any member of the team is not well disposed to every other, then there will be problems. By genial, I do mean that when members know each other, their strengths, weaknesses and style, it is much easier to develop the cohesiveness necessary to be high performing.

That is where commitment comes in. I do not describe commitment as a general feeling that one has towards others, but rather the specific things that each member of the team commits to one another and to the company. For example, the management team members must commit to clear communication with one another. Finding out about problems indirectly can be the cause of dissension on a team, so each member ought to commit to going directly to another team member when there is a problem. When team members know each other well and share a genial relationship, it is possible that communication can concentrate on a problem, rather than a person.

Management team members ought to commit to the company strategy. This does not mean that there should not be discussion or disagreement on the development of the strategy, but that such discussion, disagreement and eventual consensus around strategy should focus on the business, not the relationships among the management team.

Finally, management team members ought to commit to the success of each other and the recognition to each other’s success. Becoming successful by pulling another team member down is rarely the path to long-term success for oneself. Helping another team member that is struggling strengthens the whole team. Success is rarely a one person achievement, so that recognizing the participation of another management team member and their employees in one’s own success will lead to a more sound management team.

Unintended Consequences

Business agility demands that a business be ready to react quickly to their environment in order to take advantage of change. However, there are times when a fast change results in unintended consequences. Many are the stories of plans gone awry, even when well researched and grounded in fact. All the more reason not to make snap decisions that can take your business in the wrong direction. Here are some questions that can help you discern the difference.

Are we equipped to handle the change? There are many companies that are the victim of their own success. Something that seems like a good idea turns out to be a great idea, to the point that the company is unable to keep up with demand. Before making a change or introducing a new product or service you need to ask several questions. The first is about volume, do you have the infrastructure to keep up demand? The second is about resources, do you have the people to keep up with the demand.

What would we do if demand was 2 times what you predict? 10 times? 100 times? Using hypothetical numbers allows you to analyze what effect different scenarios might have on your business. You may discover that up to a certain point, you can handle the new business or increased volume that a change may foster, but nothing beyond that point. If that is the case, you may want to introduce the change or new product to a smaller segment of your clients or the market.

Is the change based on fact or a hunch? It is true that there are those that can study a market and get a “gut-level” sense of what is going on. Generally speaking, I would not believe that of myself, and you should be skeptical as well. Is your hunch based on research and data, or is it based on anecdotal evidence but not supported by more extensive research? Getting to market with a new product or service includes doing a certain amount of research to back up the hunch.

Do you have a Plan B? If the new product or service does become successful beyond what you can handle, do you have a Plan B in place? Plan B can include outsourcing on a temporary basis, or using temporary staff to fill in. Be ready for success beyond what you predict.

These simple questions can help your business avoid unintended consequences on the road to success.

Great Customer Service is No Accident

Nothing brings out the bulldog in me more quickly than poor customer service. Recently, the bulldog has had too many occasions to come out! In one case, a company website where I was trying to pay a bill was not working. The site was quite rudimentary for a $6 billion dollar company, with no help function at all. When I called the only number listed on the site, I went through the “pass you on” routine, with lots of hold time during which I was told how important I was to their company.  Finally, I reached the office of the right person to talk to, but she was on vacation. I sincerely hoped that she would make it back from vacation else I might never be able to pay my bill online (or anyone else, for that matter).

In another instance, a well-known delivery company left me a form to sign to have a package delivered on the second attempt. I even called the company to let them know that they could leave the package in the foyer and that I would sign the form. The next day, I found a second form next to the first. When I called this time, the customer service person could not tell me what happened and passed me on to the local terminal.

After a couple of tries, and more messages about how important I was, I reached the terminal manager. The manager explained to me that company regulations did not allow them to leave the package in the foyer of my condo. To put a quick end to the story, about fifteen minutes later when I removed my teeth from his leg (figuratively, of course), he agreed to have the package left as I had requested.

Customer service should be in the DNA of every company, and it does not happen by accident. Based on my experience, both as a customer and as a service provider, here are some guidelines to great customer service:

  1. Every employee of a company is potentially a customer service agent. Even amid the myriad choices in a company’s voice response system many people get through to one employee or another. Therefore, all employees must be trained and ready to handle customer service at a triage level, that is, be able to understand the problem and get the customer to the right place the first time.
  2. There should never be a circumstance where the only person who can solve the problem is not there. When there is a technical problem, multiple experts must be on hand. For a small company, this may mean having experts on call. With today’s technology, reaching a person who can solve a problem should not be a problem.
  3. Customer service representatives must be given reasonable authority to solve a problem. Repeating company policy is not a solution. Nor is saying, “My supervisor is not here right now, he will call you back.”
  4. At the very least, customer service representatives, supervisors and managers must learn how to ask questions and listen, not only to understand the problem, but ascertain what the solution is that the customer wants.

Finally, a suggestion to all companies: please stop using the “your call is important to us” routine!

Chief Twitter Officer?

The headline to an article published recently in India Real Time (WSJ.com) read, “Can Chief Twit be far behind?” The reference was to the possibility that the Chief Twitter Officer may already be in existence. The article also mentions officers such as Chief Monster at Monster.com, Chief Internet Evangelist at Google and Chief Belief Officer at Future Group. Your humble blogger, who is known as the Chief Bulldog at the The COO’s Bulldog certainly is in good company.

Then there is the Chief Human Capital Officer at the US Department of Energy. I don’t know; I think I would rather be a person than capital, what do you think? Not to be outdone, another government agency has a Chief FOIA Officer. (Would that be pronounced “foya” or “foeea”?) It turns out that the Chief FOIA Officer works for the FCA, or the Farm Credit Agency, processing Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests that come to the agency. I wonder if the federal government has a Chief Acronyms Officer to make all of these up.

In an article on Greenbiz.com Ellen Weintraub complained that while she had seen plenty of Vice Presidents of Sustainability and Directors of Sustainability, she had yet to see a Chief Officer of Sustainability. Perhaps there is not enough work to keep that person busy, this making them more of a Chief Unsustainability Officer. When I looked up the definition of sustainable, I came across the words “carry on”. The Chief Carry On Officer would either be in charge of company parties or loading people on airplanes these days!

Then there is the Chief Green Officer; is the word green a noun denoting the person’s responsibilities or an adjective describing their color? Or is the Chief Green Officer simply another name for the CFO? It has gotten so bad that Steve Tobak, in his BNET column, The Corner Office, opines that we should no longer say C-Suite, but should rather use the term C-Tent!

Getting back to the Chief Twit; I worked for him a number of years ago, but fortunately did not stay long at that company!